Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald’s Bags – Or – Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikePaper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikeYou know how some people can take what’s seemingly garbage and make pretty things out of them?  Yeah, artist Yuken Teruya is one of those people.  The artist took a take-out bag from McDonald’s (an item which I imagine millions of are tossed each day) and sculpted some unbelievably beautiful trees out of them.  Using the bag’s bright coloring for the tree, the bag itself is used as a frame for the sculptures.

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikeOfficially titled Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like, the trees are on display at the David B. Smith Gallery in London from Aug.3 to Sept.1.

Competitive Eater Furious Pete Takes The Michael Phelps Dietary Challenge – 12,000 Calories In One Sitting

Competitive Eater Furious Pete Takes The Michael Phelps Dietary Challenge - 12,000 Calories In One Sitting

You’ve no doubt noticed that the Olympics are currently on, even if the coverage is horribly delayed on our US airwaves.  You may have also noticed that Michael Phelps has won an awful lot of medals.  During an interview he revealed that his training diet consists of 12,000+ calories per day.  That’s the better part of a weeks worth of food for most of us.  He packs that into 24 hours.  Furious Pete is a competitive eater.  He saw that as a challenge.  If only competitive eater were an Olympic sport.

So then, this is one man – eating 12,300 calories in one half hour sitting.  It’s been edited down to a few minutes – you can imagine watching someone eating for half an hour would be about as entertaining as a spinal tap.  Check out the video below.

- via Blame It On The Voices -

This Is A Louis Vuitton Waffle Maker

This Is A Louis Vuitton Waffle Maker

Artist Andrew Lewicki wants to raise the hackles of incredibly sue happy Louis Vuitton make you an incredibly overpriced breakfast.  He’s created the Louis Vuitton Waffle Maker.  Featuring, as you might imagine, the classic Vuitton pattern, the waffle maker is teflon coated and is perhaps just what you need for a designer breakfast.  Magnifique!

This Is A Louis Vuitton Waffle Maker

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

Artist Sayaka Ganz was deeply impacted as a child by Japanese Shinto beliefs that all objects and organisms have spirits, and was also taught that objects discarded before the end of their usefulness “weep at night inside the trash bin” (how awesome is that?).  As her artistic side developed, she infused her artwork with these beliefs, using discarded and reclaimed household objects as a medium for her sculptures. Ganz says:

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

I only select objects that have been used and discarded. My goal is for each object to transcend its origin by being integrated into an animal/ organic forms that are alive and in motion. This process of reclamation and regeneration is liberating to me as an artist.

 

Building these sculptures helps me understand the situations that surround me. It reminds me that even if there is a conflict right now, there is also a solution in which all the pieces can coexist peacefully. Though there are wide gaps in some areas and small holes in others, when seen from the distance there is great beauty and harmony in our community. Through my sculptures I transmit a message of hope.

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

Animal Sculptures Made from Reclaimed Kitchen And Household Objects

These pictures are only a small representation of her work.  Check out the link below for a better idea what she’s capable of.

artist’s site, via Colossal -

Amazing Coffee Filter Art by Ben Blake

Amazing Coffee Filter Art by Ben BlakeCoffee makes a good portion of the world go around.  It certainly makes Seattle buzz.  Artist Ben Blake believes that “coffee inspires creativity.”  I’d buy that.  He uses that theory to celebrate coffee and coffee culture.  Draw Coffee is his website, and Blake uses his wicked skills in typography and doodling to create clever illustrations of almost anything coffee-related.  Check out some of his work below.

Amazing Coffee Filter Art by Ben Blake

Amazing Coffee Filter Art by Ben Blake

Amazing Coffee Filter Art by Ben Blake

Draw Coffee, via Kitchn - 

This Is The Burritob0t; A DIY Machine That Prints Customized Burritos. Yes – The Future Is Now

This Is The Burritob0t; A DIY Machine That Prints Customized Burritos.  Yes - The Future Is NowThe Burritob0t takes all that nifty 3D plastic modeling technology and puts it to a use we can all appreciate.  Burritos.  Created by New York University ITP grad student Marko Manriquez, the prototype and its function are meant to help bring attention to issues surrounding our food and where it comes from.  Working along the lines of a giant food grade printer, the “ink” cartridges hold crema, guacamole, and a choice of salsa.

This Is The Burritob0t; A DIY Machine That Prints Customized Burritos.  Yes - The Future Is Now

Sadly Burritob0t (and it’s iPhone/iPad control app) are in the prototype stage, so it’ll be awhile before you’re printing your favorite burrito.  Manriquez has said that Kickstarter is on its way to drumming up the necessary funding for the artist’s ultimate goal.   A Mobile Printed-Burrito Truck.  How nice does that sound?

This Is The Burritob0t; A DIY Machine That Prints Customized Burritos.  Yes - The Future Is Now

Because the burrito is a mass market consumable, it lends easily as a way for examining and stimulating discussion on various aspects of the food industry including: how and where our food is grown, methods of production, environmental impact, cultural appropriation and perhaps most importantly — what our food means to us. By parodying the humble burrito’s ingredients and methods of production we can shed light on these exogenous factors and interconnected systems surrounding the simple burrito.

Check out the video below.

- via TheCreatorsProject -