Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald’s Bags – Or – Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikePaper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikeYou know how some people can take what’s seemingly garbage and make pretty things out of them?  Yeah, artist Yuken Teruya is one of those people.  The artist took a take-out bag from McDonald’s (an item which I imagine millions of are tossed each day) and sculpted some unbelievably beautiful trees out of them.  Using the bag’s bright coloring for the tree, the bag itself is used as a frame for the sculptures.

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like

Paper Trees Made From Recycled McDonald's Bags - Or - Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes LikeOfficially titled Notice-Forest: What Victory Tastes Like, the trees are on display at the David B. Smith Gallery in London from Aug.3 to Sept.1.

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

Do you need to smile today?  Even if you didn’t need to, artist My Dog Sighs will most likely ensure that you do.

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

My Dog Sighs uses crushed cans he finds on the street as canvases for his Canman series.  The first in the transformation from can to canman is a fresh coat of stony grey paint – which serves as skin tone.  The artist uses each cans individual quirks and blemishes to reveal their own unique personalities.  Some cans are happy, some look quite sad, some are human, and some are animal.

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

 

Once completed, the cans are placed prominently back on the street where they wait to be discovered by passersby.

Can Man, Faces Painted on Found Cans by Street Artist My Dog Sighs

-via Laughing Squid-

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Here’s something to brighten your day.  Dan Cretu is a cheeky food artist and he’s brought out some summer fare.  He’s sliced, peeled, and arranged various fruits and veggies to resemble everyday objects.  Nice to see it’s safe for our vegan fans as well, no bacon or meat to sully anyone’s day.  Check out a few more pics below.

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

Dan Cretu Brings You Food Sculptures That Look Like Everyday Objects

- via Laughing Squid -

 

Yes These Are Lamps Made From Recycled Coffee Grounds

Yes These Are Lamps Made From Recycled Coffee Grounds

I’m imagining you could make a killing on these if you linked up with Starbucks.

Raul Lauri has come up with an innovative and novel use for a renewable material most people chuck right into the trash.  He’s produced a set of lamps (and it looks like mugs and bowls) made from recycled coffee grounds.  Officially titled Decafé, the coffee grounds are heat and pressure treated, and formed into whatever shape suits the designers purpose.  The project netted him the first prize Salon Satellite Award, 2012.

Yes These Are Lamps Made From Recycled Coffee Grounds

Yes These Are Lamps Made From Recycled Coffee Grounds

Yes These Are Lamps Made From Recycled Coffee Grounds

- via Inhabitat -

Brownie Bread Pudding….(Or What to Do With Stale Brownies)

Brownie Bread PuddingWe bought little brownie “bite” kind of things the other day.  Well I didn’t, my other half did.  I sat on the couch and had some champagne.  They’re really just little brownies baked into the shape of a cup.  They were a midnight impulse purchase; something to snack on late at night to satisfy an urge.  I was fairly excited when I saw them.  Who wouldn’t be? Unfortunately I’m fairly certain these have been marketed for sopping up oil spills somewhere and that’s the reason we got them so cheaply.  So bad were these as a late night purchase, half of them went stale.  Good brownies, anything tasty for that matter, does not go stale in our house.  How does a food producer expect to have a viable model for themselves making stuff that sucks?  Are there that many people who’ll buy something so mediocre and think  “Hey I’d like to spend my hard-earned money on something awful, AGAIN!!” Continue reading